Category: Compliance


WhyMicrosoftThe moment I almost forget what a pain Windows 10 is, this message pops up on my PC.  Why did you have to ask me this question again, Microsoft?  Why must you remind me of my suffering?  All the details of what I have experienced are too much to cover in a single blog, so I will do my best to focus on the big issues.  As such, I won’t be whining about Windows 10 not consistently recognizing my finger, but that is a common theme here.

Nor will I spend the time rehashing various feature disruptions associated with forced updates to the degree that they deserve.  Most notably, Bitlocker comes to mind, but I cannot bring myself to go there in any significant detail. Suffice it to say that when I lost access to my encrypted Bitlocker drive due to an update, the documented fix required reinstalling an older version of Windows 10 to recover my data.  I chose to buy another hard drive since it was less complicated and time-consuming.

At one point in January of this year, I estimated that the combined dysfunction of Windows 10 and Office 365 had cost me at least two full days of productivity for my own system, never mind other people that I provide support to.  In that month alone, I personally spent over an hour a day on average dealing with issues that you would never see on a Windows 7 PC running a non-365 version of Office.

As an IT professional with thirty years of experience, I can honestly say that the Windows 10 operating system (OS) may be the most intrusive and unreliable OS ever created by Microsoft.  Computers and operating systems are intended to make our work lives more efficient and less challenging, not less efficient and more challenging.  On a regular basis, Windows 10 and its cohort, Office 365, thwart productivity through seemingly incessant and meaningless updates performed in the almighty name of compliance and security.

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Even the most basic functionality of turning off your computer is challenged by the HAL-like behavior of this OS.  On my way out for a recent Thanksgiving road trip, I attempted to shut down my PC (four times).  Each time, my PC appeared to shutdown it came back on again.  It was clearly going to do this ad infinitum, which led to a few expletive laden Google searches like, “Windows 10 will not $&%#ing shut down!”

This is not the first time I have seen this particular issue in Windows 10 or similar quirky bugs like the black screen issue, so my patience was tested.  Eventually, I rediscovered and used the “hold the left-shift key and shutdown” method to wrestle my insubordinate PC into submission, then for good measure I actually unplugged it too.  Let’s see you restart now, Windows 10!  Thankfully, it didn’t.

Sure, this OS looks good on the surface, and in some ways it is better than its predecessor, but there are some major drawbacks.  For example, trying to use an app arbitrarily deemed as “not stable” or “incompatible” results in Windows 10 uninstalling that app without users’ permission.  Windows 10 won’t necessarily remove the app as soon as you install it, but when Windows applies updates again, it will remove the offending app and does not notify users.

Want to postpone an update or set the time updates are supposed to occur? … Go ahead.  There are settings for that, but whether you go through the exercise of configuring those settings or not, Windows 10 pretty much seems to do whatever it wants to do when it wants to.  I feel like I have lost control of my computers that run Windows 10.  Microsoft is in charge of them now and decides when and how I can use them.

If you have a critical online meeting, work that needs to be done right now, or a plane to catch, you can almost count on Windows 10 attempting to update or do some other thing that doesn’t need to be done at that exact time.  I don’t know how it does this, but it does.  It could just be that it is always doing an update.  In a nutshell, if you are familiar with the printer in the movie Office Space, Windows 10 is that printer.

Given my experiences, recommending this OS to anyone before they felt that they truly needed to move to it would be willfully irresponsible.  That said, I suspect there is a small contingent of users that Windows 10 helps stay out of trouble.  I know some of those people, but the masses should not have Windows 10 on their computers when there are other more reliable – as defined by computers that do what you want them to do when you want them to do it – alternatives.

Many of my financial services customers have likely moved to Windows 10 or plan to move to Windows 10 in the future.  For those businesses where compliance and security are paramount, staying the course on an aging OS like Windows 7 will become more difficult, given that Windows 10 is widely perceived as being more secure.

Understandably, for corporate use Windows 10 may just be a desktop environment that is used to gain access to a more secure and redundant cloud environment.  As such, the pain points I describe related to Windows 10 could be less of an issue for these users.  However, consigning users to Microsoft’s decisions about how they can use their PCs at any given time is scary.

Ultimately, the path Microsoft is on with Windows 10 is either headed toward total authoritarian rule over personal computer systems, or toward the eventual demise of Microsoft’s stranglehold on the PC OS market in favor of a more agreeable and obedient operating system.

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By way of disclaimer, I am using Windows 10 Professional, but know that Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB, which will soon be renamed to LTSC in 2019, follows the more traditional release policy and is not updated with the frequency of Microsoft’s other versions of Windows 10.  Based on my experience to date with Windows 10 Professional, the Enterprise LTSB product would probably be a much better user experience.  Also, related to Windows updates, my advanced options are set to Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted) with the option to defer feature updates by up to 180 days and security updates by up to 30 days.  I realize that I could gain a greater level of reliability and reduce the problems I experience by changing to the straight Semi-Annual Channel, which would delay feature updates by an additional 4 months.  My opinions are the result of using Windows 10 as both my primary desktop and notebook OS for the past two years.


About the Author: Kevin Shea is the Founder and Principal Kevin Shea Impact 2010Consultant of Quartare; Quartare provides a wide variety of technology solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit Quartare.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@quartare.com.

sticky-notes-to-do-listAround this same time last year, many of us said our final goodbyes to Windows XP and Exchange 2003.  This year, Microsoft’s latest End-Of-Life (EOL) event – along with good sense – will force most of the firms that are still using Windows Server 2003  to replace it with a newer version of the Windows Server operating system (OS).  July 14th, 2015 marks the end of extended support for the 2003 product line – after that date, there won’t be any more security updates.

For those unfamiliar with the issue this raises, compliance regulation and standards related to private information and security dictate that firms must keep up-to-date with regular patches to the software and hardware that powers their businesses.  Your firm’s Written Information Security Program (WISP) should detail a policy of adherence to these standards, among many others, and in there somewhere you have almost certainly indicated that you are keeping your systems updated with respect to security.

Like Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 has been around long enough and really should be replaced, so there is not much point in delaying the switch.  Most firms have likely changed over to Windows Server 2008 or 2012, but those that haven’t made the change yet should be planning on upgrading their server(s) in Q2 of 2015.

 

rackAlternatives to Windows 2003?

Assuming your firm is committed to Microsoft Server products, you have two choices:

1. Windows Server 2008 r2 (2008)

2008 is a mature operating system, which is still in use at a large number of firms today. However, mainstream support for 2008 ended earlier this year (1/13/2015), and though extended support is available until 1/14/2020, it probably doesn’t make sense to move from 2003 to 2008 in 2015. Firms that have existing 2008 software licenses may not want to incur the additional expense of 2012 licenses, and those with significant compatibility concerns may opt to install Windows 2008 on new server hardware.

2. Windows Server 2012 r2 (2012)

2012 is the latest and greatest from Microsoft. It has a shiny new interface and a bevy of neat features like deduplication. My experience with 2012 has been overwhelmingly positive. Though worries about 2012 compatibility with legacy applications may delay widespread acceptance of this operating system, many firms will ultimately choose to make the switch to 2012.

What happens if we stay on Windows 2003?

Your server will still work, but you will not get any more security updates from Microsoft, and your firm will technically be out of compliance.

What else could happen?

Software companies and other parties your firm interfaces with will assume that you are making these updates.  Your firm’s failure to upgrade to a later version of Windows Server could cause problems that you and your staff may not be able to anticipate.

As an example of this, one of my clients that was slow to upgrade all of their Windows XP systems last year found that the latest version of Orion’s desktop software, which was automatically updated sometime in Q1 of 2014, was incompatible with Windows XP.  Unfortunately for the client, there wasn’t a way to reverse the update or use an older version.

At the time, I was surprised, especially because the customer wasn’t given any notice of the “feature enhancement.”  It didn’t make sense that a software company would launch an update incompatible with existing customer desktops that were still supported by Microsoft.  Thankfully, Orion addressed the issue quickly by providing the users affected with remote desktop (RDP) connections to Orion servers for an interim period.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is the Founder and Principal Kevin Shea Impact 2010Consultant of Quartare; Quartare provides a wide variety of technology solutions to investment management and financial services firms nationwide.

For details, please visit Quartare.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@quartare.com.

iStock_000021815840XSmallAll things change – even things at the SEC.   Previously, investment managers could upload text (aka ASCII) files detailing their holdings to Edgar.  This quarter, a change was made, requiring the file to be formatted in XML.  Investors have 45 days from the end of the quarter to file their 13F reports, so Q2 reports are due today.

Some users that attempted to get these reports done earlier in Q3 expressed frustration with the XML issue and their ability to get more proactive assistance from Advent to address it.  Last week, as the filing deadline approached, Advent reached out to clients, alerting them of the change and directing them to an ASCII to XML conversion tool to facilitate the process.  In my own experience with Advent’s support team, I found them both helpful and knowledgeable in regard to the 13F reporting issues.

Though Advent’s documentation states that the 13F report and conversion tool requires Axys 3.8.5 or higher, the report from Axys 3.8.5 worked fine when we used it on Axys 3.7 with a client.  APX users can use the same utility.  The utility was simple to use and worked well;  the biggest challenge for users is finding the file they need to convert.

The 13F reporting mechanism is functional, but the setup seems cryptic and disjointed.  First-time users expecting a turn-key, intuitive solution will be disappointed.  Fortunately, the details of what is required to produce 13F reports are well-documented in Advent’s help file.

How 13F Reporting Works…

By default, the 13F report only includes the equity asset class.   It is possible to exclude individual securities through the use of the 13F.est file, but it is not possible to include individual securities.  Additional asset classes may be added.  Report-specific labels must be added to the 13F portfolio file to make the report work properly.

When the supporting files are properly configured, the report produces detailed holdings and simultaneously generates an inftable.txt file with the same information.  This file is placed in the specific user folder (i.g. f:\axys3\users\amy) of the person running the report on the network version of Axys or the root folder of Axys on the single-user version of Axys.  When users have generated a 13F report without missing data or error messages, they are ready run to the conversion utility to produce the inftable.xml file and upload the information to the Edgar site.

This quarter, running and filing 13F reports was more challenging than it has been in the past, since users were forced to correctly implement the 13F report in order to successfully generate an XML file.  Based on my experience with users, this was something they had not been doing in the past.  Most users would run the report to get something close to what they needed and then manually modify the text file, rather than keep all of the information updated in the 13F portfolio and 13F.est files.  Going forward, the process will still require that new securities and relevant asset classes be classified specifically for the 13F report, but future report runs should be simpler.

For more info on 13F reporting, refer to the SEC’s document detailing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.