Tag Archive: Client Statements


Earlier this year, Advent sent an alert to Axys users about Windows 8 issues and how to deal with them, as an interim solution to problems that Windows 8 users can face.  It is good that Advent is proactively alerting users, but I am not recommending that any of my clients move to Windows 8 just yet. Upgrading your office to Windows 8 is premature, unless you are willing to pay the premium and deal with the frustrations typically associated with being an early adopter of the latest Windows operating system.

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If your firm uses Axys, you may be wondering whether a new release is in the works. Though Advent hasn’t publicly set a release date for the next version yet, I expect they soon will. Based on what Advent has done in the past, users should expect a 3.9 release in the near future. That release will likely support Office 2013, and Adobe Acrobat 11, and may also feature improved Windows 8 compatibility.

Though these types of updates seem minimal, they have more substance than you might think. Axys remains a very functional and cost-efficient option for advisors. Compound reports generated in Axys 3.8.5 using Excel 2010 graphs rival output from APX at a fraction of the cost. If your compound reports look dated, find out what version of Excel you are using. Using the latest version of Excel in conjunction with a version of Axys that supports it can give your reports a newer look and feel.

Axys 4?

I would like to think that Axys 4 is in the works, but a major revision would probably mean a name change – perhaps “Cloud Axys?” Longer-term, expect Axys to undergo a technology transformation if Advent wants to keep the platform alive and decides to commit greater resources to future updates that keep pace with technology trends. While the number of APX, Geneva and Black Diamond users have continued to grow, Axys users still account for a considerable number of Advent’s clients.

Historically, Axys was the lynchpin of Advent Software’s success and center of their hub of solutions for their customers. Replacing the PMS of an investment advisor is more complicated than it seems.  It impacts many of the systems at an advisor’s office, as well as the people you need to support your business, the skills they need, and what third-party solutions are available.

It would be ideal for Advent if Axys customers moved to another Advent product in the future. Those conversions and newer software licensing agreements would generate more income, while eventually allowing Advent to phase out Axys without major renovations.  However, Axys users looking at APX, Black Diamond and Geneva don’t always see a clear path.

In the past two years, Tamarac/Envestnet and other competitors have won over some Axys customers. My firsthand knowledge of a couple of advisors who made the move to Tamarac leads me to believe that Advent didn’t need to lose these customers. Through better communication, negotiation or product positioning, they could have kept the business.  On that note, I spoke with an Axys user last week that requested an APX quote after seeing a demo in Q2 and never got one.

Perception is Reality

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“Be where your enemy is not.” -Sun Tzu

Current Axys users represent a ground of contention that will not be ignored by Advent’s competitors and should not be ignored by Advent. At stake is the perception of who provides the very best PMS platforms for investment advisors.  Advent may be willing to let some of their Axys clients go quietly, but in doing so they risk losing those relationships long-term, if not permanently, as well as other advisors in their sphere of influence.  Axys users represent a critical mass that could fuel the growth of  Advent’s competition in the near future.  Left unchecked, Advent competitors garnering Axys users now could ultimately vie for current APX, Geneva, and Black Diamond users down the road.

Obviously, Advent cannot be all things to all customers, but they can make a better effort to keep existing Axys clients in the fold.  In order to do so, Advent must improve communications with Axys users, affirm their commitment to Axys, and continue to add technology enhancements to Axys on a regular basis.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.

black coffee,glasses and newspaper on business fileI have been talking about the evolution of investment reporting for years and telling anyone who would listen that their clients will soon have other investment reporting options.  My dream or vision of the future includes me (of course) providing the interface to facilitate getting data from financial services firms to a secure data warehouse via xPort where their clients could download the data for analysis on an open reporting platform.

As I discussed this with one of my clients at a recent Schwab conference, they shared their concerns with me.   I was told, “It’s basically a problem of apples and oranges.”

My long-time client and friend explained to me that they would have concerns that data they reviewed and corrected (“apples”) might be reported as uncorrected data (“oranges”).

Though data aggregators exist and have much of the data required, they won’t have it all unless advisors participate and cooperate in the process.  Reconciliation needs to be performed and maintained on an ongoing basis with respect to assets under management, inception-to-date performance, and tax cost.  No one is more motivated and qualified to maintain that data integrity than the advisors whose decisions, service, and bottom line are impacted by the quality of that data.

Big Brother will have access to this data too – that’s not part of my plan, but just a given eventuality and perhaps already a reality.  Regulatory powers will employ predictive analytics to proactively search for potential fraud.  For example, an advisor reporting the same exact composite return two years in a row is possible, but highly unlikely and worth investigating.  When more scrutiny is applied to this data, one can only hope that the benefits of additional regulation will outweigh the compliance headaches.

Enter SigFig

SigFigAccording to their web site, SigFig was born out of the noble desire to serve the millions of investors that don’t meet typical portfolio minimums and cannot afford quality investment advice.  Your clients may be using SigFig already.  If you haven’t seen it, SigFig is to investment reporting what Mint is to personal financial reporting.  Unfortunately for investment advisors, SigFig has a similar business model, meaning that investors do not pay for the service, but instead get solicited with offers that appear relevant to their investments; for example, “this fund is outperforming your fund “or “your investment advisor is overcharging you.”

Using SigFig, investors can view a dashboard summary of investment reporting information that looks better than what many investment advisors currently provide to their clients.  However, as one familiar the details of performance calculations, client billing, and reconciliation, I am naturally concerned about possible data quality issues.  The idea of replacing the sound advice of an investment professional with algorithms designed to place ads – even though those ads are intended to be unbiased – seems inherently flawed.

To learn more, you can check out SigFig here:

www.sigfig.com

In my preferred vision, advisors would pay an interface fee and their participating clients would purchase SAAS reporting or a Droid/iOS app.  Idyllic as it might seem, this version of the future would allow investment advisors and their clients to share views of reports created by impartial third-party reporting sources.

SigFig is a step in the right direction, and should serve as warning to investment advisors that more robust investment reporting information will be delivered to their clients whether they participate in the process themselves or allow their clients to find it on their own.

The Best Investment Reports

It makes perfect sense that your firm should want to provide the best reports possible to your clients, without incurring an unreasonable expense or maintaining an unmanageable reporting process.  Unfortunately, what’s best for your firm and what’s best your client may be two different things. You want to validate your investment methodology and highlight the value continued use of your firm offers, but you also need to keep your client’s best interests in mind.  More than one advisor I have worked with in the past has chosen to shy away from slick, eye-popping reports, instead favoring black-and-white reports where simple numbers alone underscore performance.  In the opinion of these advisors, the relationship with a client is more important than fancy reporting and such reports can distract investors.

Call modern reports a prudent best practice or self-serving marketing effort designed to ensure your firm’s survival.  The truth is that they are a little of both.  Clients expect decent reporting, so substandard reports are now passé.  Quarterly report packages like those I have helped clients create for twenty years are also known as presentations, and perhaps that is a better name for them.  It describes what investors are really trying to do at quarter end.

Sample Client Reporting Presentation

Sample Client Reporting Presentation

Every quarter, advisors have an obligation and opportunity to make a presentation of how their clients’ investments are doing.  Most advisors also write a quarterly letter in which they address the near-term market conditions and reasonable expectations for the future while trying to impart some relevant wisdom to their investors.  Advisors are, in fact, presenting and remarketing to their clients on a quarterly basis.  Good presentations typically illustrate an advisor’s general knowledge of the markets, educate clients, and show how the advisor adds value.  The reports included in these presentations also present holdings analyses that provide clients with additional insight into their investments, but, most importantly, these reports provide the client with performance figures and comparative benchmarks for various time periods.

Report Development or Adoption

For some firms, proprietary custom report writing is required to meet the needs outlined above.  With this requirement comes the necessity to employ staff or contract with vendors to produce and maintain the reports.  The effort to produce high-quality reports can be daunting whether the project is handled internally or outsourced.  Many custom reports, by definition, are in flux.  In a typical quarter, custom reports may undergo additional feature enhancements and require maintenance modifications or bug fixes.  In order to maintain custom reporting systems, an ongoing commitment of time and money is necessary.

Advisors may want to create distinct custom reports that are part of their brand, but given the potential complexity and cost of creating those reports – the best investment reports for those with limited funds are the ones that already exist.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.

iStock_000011903357XSmallAs quarter end approaches once more, investment advisors gather their resolve and strive to implement new system enhancements to client statements before Q2 arrives. We all wish it could be different, but it is simply the nature of the business. Even firms with good-looking statements may rush to enhance them by incorporating new features such as blended indexes or minor report edits prior to quarter end.

Most of the systems implemented at investment advisories are run on a daily basis, but client statements are typically generated on a quarterly basis. Some investment managers produce monthly statements, but they are in the minority. In the near future, these types of periodic statements will become less relevant than an investor’s ability to generate meaningful client statements on demand.

Amending the quarterly reporting process and report packages requires a disciplined process of setting manageable goals, gaining approval, implementing changes, testing systems and resolving potential problems. Those responsible for creating the reports require approval from management, and until they get that final approval, the time necessary to comfortably implement the changes continues to slip away.

“THE ONLY CONSTANT IS CHANGE” -Heraclitus

As quarter end gets closer, it is not unusual for those involved in the project to get mixed messages about what needs to be done for this quarter. Operations staff juggle various responsibilities. Ad hoc requests, changing priorities and management decision delays inevitably create the need to do last-minute work or postpone the project until the next month, quarter, or even year. With these types of delays, it is a wonder that any progress towards creating better client statements is ever made.

At most larger firms, management is comprised of a number of voices that have a say in whether a firm adapts new systems and reports. The decision to change quarterly reports isn’t made in a vacuum. It is a decision that may depend on a firm’s dedication to their current portfolio management system or a need to allocate limited budget resources to other high-priority issues. Good quarterly reports also underscore a firm’s philosophy, so deep thought and considerable discourse can play a part in determining the content and appearance of client statements.

SOME AXYS USERS DO NOTHING WHILE OTHERS THINK ABOUT MAKING A DECISION.

Before you summarily dismiss all Axys users as being hopelessly outdated and technically inept because they haven’t upgraded to APX or moved to another more recently released Portfolio Management System (PMS), you should understand that there are many decent-sized firms out there that are still using Axys to manage hundreds of millions or billions in assets.  Though a small group of firms really do fit the preceding description, most firms do not. The majority are firms that understand the current shortcomings of Axys and the potential benefits of APX, but also value the simplicity, efficiency, and reliability of Axys.  These firms may have considered Advent’s other offerings: Black Diamond and Geneva, but haven’t managed to find a solution that works for their firm.

As a growing number of these Axys users may be questioning their commitment to Advent, it is only natural that they vacillate to some degree between putting more money into their existing platform or changing the platform altogether. I suspect that many of Advent’s Axys clients now fit into two categories: those who are indifferent and those facing decision paralysis.

Those who are indifferent use Axys like a calculator and will continue to do so until it becomes apparent that they cannot use it any more. Those facing decision paralysis will also continue to use Axys – albeit with some reservations – until another vendor steals them away or Advent makes a bold announcement to continue to support these lost souls with renewed vigor.

In the end, a firm’s need to keep pace with client expectations and technology by providing innovative reporting should win out whether that is achieved by spending money on their existing platform or embracing another. For now, like many in the industry, I continue to hurry up and wait for investment advisors and Advent Software to do something.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.

In my role over the years as a designer and developer of client reporting packages for dozens of investment advisors, I typically work with decision-makers to facilitate the creation of new client presentations. Many of my clients already know what they want and just need help making it happen.

Though I have an excellent understanding of what is important to most investors and their clients, my opinion is seldom solicited. I speak up when an issue demands it, but most of the time I defer to advisors, listen, and do my best to create what my clients (investment managers) want. In many cases, the bulk of the project is spent on individual report exhibits with little emphasis on the way reports are organized and presented to clients.

I have worked with firms who have wanted to do the bare minimum for their clients (appraisal, and invoice) as well as clients that go above and beyond their duty to report. However, even those with the best reporting intentions can err by including a level of complexity and detail that will not benefit their clients.

On occasion, I am lucky enough to work with investment professionals who are modern thinkers and savvy marketers. The combination of these important characteristics leads to engaging projects and sophisticated report packages. These advisors apparently understand what their clients want to see, and are determined to make the desired reports a reality.

Instead of reporting only what is required, these advisors are trying to exceed the reporting expectations of their clients, and in doing so they engender trust. Their reports are comprehensive and transparent. As such, they have the possibility of highlighting poor performance, but that is a risk that needs to be taken by most advisors. The significance of disclosing this level of information is recognized by investors’ clients and should improve client communications.

In terms of presentation, reports should be bound, with a cover and/or table of contents and well-organized. When a client opens the report up, the most important things are first, and less important details follow. For example, there is a hierarchy to the way the reports are organized in the package such that the relationship is reported first and individual account reports later.  You can view a full report sample illustrating this approach here. In this specific example, the physical report package opens to display pages two and three of the PDF document, which are a relationship summary. The pages that follow provide account-level information.

Reports are typically bound electronically (i.e. PDFs) for those who deliver reports through portals or encrypted email, but firms send most their reports out on paper due to low adoption rates. Paper copies should look professional, and there are cost-efficient options to make this possible whether it is done through printing report packages on 11×17 stock with a saddle stitch or via manual binding of reports after they have been printed. Some of the manual binding options are fairly quick, but shops with hundreds or thousands of reports should not bind reports manually.

Another key to producing impressive report packages is the one-page summary, which allows a client to look at a single page if that is all they want to see. Usually, it is an exhibit that shows them where their investments are, how much they are worth, how they have grown, and how they have performed over various time periods. One-page summaries are also produced to provide information about specific asset types and performance. The idea is to create an executive summary. Clients really want a concise overview of their investments, and rarely look at all the other details that get sent to them on a quarterly basis.

How will you know if your reports have made an impression?

You will hear it from your clients. Even hard-to-please clients should appreciate these types of report improvements. So get to work now, and your new report packages could be ready for next quarter.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.

Whether you are an investment professional or an individual investor, you want to be on the respective sending or receiving end of meaningful statements that effectively convey what has transpired on a quarterly basis. These reports may represent clients and investors’ only communication of the quarter. As such, the importance of mainstream client reports cannot be underestimated. Advisors do not necessarily need a state-of-the-art reporting package, but they also cannot afford to have their reports look dated.

A couple of years ago, I was approached by an investment firm looking to overhaul their client statements. The impetus was the departure of a client, who was “nice” enough to drop off a sample of their new investment advisor’s reporting package. I was presented with the package and asked how much it would cost to do something like this for them.

I went through the lengthy presentation-quality package in detail. It was clearly something that was produced through a custom report-writing engine or a third-party, and not a standard report package by any means. The reports included comprehensive summaries of holdings, allocation, fixed income, equity, and performance. All of the reports contained detailed graphs and charts.

We came up with a number – roughly 50k – and we were not surprised when the prospective client did a double take and put the project out for other bids. Our bid was for a system that worked with the underlying Advent data, but stood on its own. In order to produce the high-quality output they wanted, we needed to get the data out of Axys and into a format where we would be able to use report-writing tools like Crystal Reports and SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS). That would enable us to create reports of the same caliber. We had done it successfully for other clients and knew what was required.

However, our prospective client made some internal concessions on the presentation-quality aspect of the reports they wanted versus that original package, and eventually agreed to have a less expensive, but well-known competitor do the work as custom compound reports. Shortly after the job began, they started hearing a two letter word few advisors like — NO. It was the answer to whether they could have certain reports in landscape or portrait. And it was the answer to whether certain report components could appear on the same page.

With that experience in mind, the client called us back and asked us if we could do the job using compound reports. We agreed and said YES to all of their requests. We delivered their new reporting package, which consisted of the same types of portfolio summaries they had originally shown us. The reports are generated through the use of compound Axys reports and assembled via Encore, our PDF report packaging application.

The client reports that you send out every quarter are a representation of who your firm is and what you do. Good quarterly reports are an opportunity for your firm to maintain or improve your clients’ opinion of your service. Conversely, substandard quarterly reports are a liability that speaks to your clients every quarter. What do your quarterly reports say about your firm?

About the Author:
Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide. For more information, please visit isitc.com , contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.