Category: Axys


Earlier this year, Advent sent an alert to Axys users about Windows 8 issues and how to deal with them, as an interim solution to problems that Windows 8 users can face.  It is good that Advent is proactively alerting users, but I am not recommending that any of my clients move to Windows 8 just yet. Upgrading your office to Windows 8 is premature, unless you are willing to pay the premium and deal with the frustrations typically associated with being an early adopter of the latest Windows operating system.

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If your firm uses Axys, you may be wondering whether a new release is in the works. Though Advent hasn’t publicly set a release date for the next version yet, I expect they soon will. Based on what Advent has done in the past, users should expect a 3.9 release in the near future. That release will likely support Office 2013, and Adobe Acrobat 11, and may also feature improved Windows 8 compatibility.

Though these types of updates seem minimal, they have more substance than you might think. Axys remains a very functional and cost-efficient option for advisors. Compound reports generated in Axys 3.8.5 using Excel 2010 graphs rival output from APX at a fraction of the cost. If your compound reports look dated, find out what version of Excel you are using. Using the latest version of Excel in conjunction with a version of Axys that supports it can give your reports a newer look and feel.

Axys 4?

I would like to think that Axys 4 is in the works, but a major revision would probably mean a name change – perhaps “Cloud Axys?” Longer-term, expect Axys to undergo a technology transformation if Advent wants to keep the platform alive and decides to commit greater resources to future updates that keep pace with technology trends. While the number of APX, Geneva and Black Diamond users have continued to grow, Axys users still account for a considerable number of Advent’s clients.

Historically, Axys was the lynchpin of Advent Software’s success and center of their hub of solutions for their customers. Replacing the PMS of an investment advisor is more complicated than it seems.  It impacts many of the systems at an advisor’s office, as well as the people you need to support your business, the skills they need, and what third-party solutions are available.

It would be ideal for Advent if Axys customers moved to another Advent product in the future. Those conversions and newer software licensing agreements would generate more income, while eventually allowing Advent to phase out Axys without major renovations.  However, Axys users looking at APX, Black Diamond and Geneva don’t always see a clear path.

In the past two years, Tamarac/Envestnet and other competitors have won over some Axys customers. My firsthand knowledge of a couple of advisors who made the move to Tamarac leads me to believe that Advent didn’t need to lose these customers. Through better communication, negotiation or product positioning, they could have kept the business.  On that note, I spoke with an Axys user last week that requested an APX quote after seeing a demo in Q2 and never got one.

Perception is Reality

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“Be where your enemy is not.” -Sun Tzu

Current Axys users represent a ground of contention that will not be ignored by Advent’s competitors and should not be ignored by Advent. At stake is the perception of who provides the very best PMS platforms for investment advisors.  Advent may be willing to let some of their Axys clients go quietly, but in doing so they risk losing those relationships long-term, if not permanently, as well as other advisors in their sphere of influence.  Axys users represent a critical mass that could fuel the growth of  Advent’s competition in the near future.  Left unchecked, Advent competitors garnering Axys users now could ultimately vie for current APX, Geneva, and Black Diamond users down the road.

Obviously, Advent cannot be all things to all customers, but they can make a better effort to keep existing Axys clients in the fold.  In order to do so, Advent must improve communications with Axys users, affirm their commitment to Axys, and continue to add technology enhancements to Axys on a regular basis.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.

iStock_000021815840XSmallAll things change – even things at the SEC.   Previously, investment managers could upload text (aka ASCII) files detailing their holdings to Edgar.  This quarter, a change was made, requiring the file to be formatted in XML.  Investors have 45 days from the end of the quarter to file their 13F reports, so Q2 reports are due today.

Some users that attempted to get these reports done earlier in Q3 expressed frustration with the XML issue and their ability to get more proactive assistance from Advent to address it.  Last week, as the filing deadline approached, Advent reached out to clients, alerting them of the change and directing them to an ASCII to XML conversion tool to facilitate the process.  In my own experience with Advent’s support team, I found them both helpful and knowledgeable in regard to the 13F reporting issues.

Though Advent’s documentation states that the 13F report and conversion tool requires Axys 3.8.5 or higher, the report from Axys 3.8.5 worked fine when we used it on Axys 3.7 with a client.  APX users can use the same utility.  The utility was simple to use and worked well;  the biggest challenge for users is finding the file they need to convert.

The 13F reporting mechanism is functional, but the setup seems cryptic and disjointed.  First-time users expecting a turn-key, intuitive solution will be disappointed.  Fortunately, the details of what is required to produce 13F reports are well-documented in Advent’s help file.

How 13F Reporting Works…

By default, the 13F report only includes the equity asset class.   It is possible to exclude individual securities through the use of the 13F.est file, but it is not possible to include individual securities.  Additional asset classes may be added.  Report-specific labels must be added to the 13F portfolio file to make the report work properly.

When the supporting files are properly configured, the report produces detailed holdings and simultaneously generates an inftable.txt file with the same information.  This file is placed in the specific user folder (i.g. f:\axys3\users\amy) of the person running the report on the network version of Axys or the root folder of Axys on the single-user version of Axys.  When users have generated a 13F report without missing data or error messages, they are ready run to the conversion utility to produce the inftable.xml file and upload the information to the Edgar site.

This quarter, running and filing 13F reports was more challenging than it has been in the past, since users were forced to correctly implement the 13F report in order to successfully generate an XML file.  Based on my experience with users, this was something they had not been doing in the past.  Most users would run the report to get something close to what they needed and then manually modify the text file, rather than keep all of the information updated in the 13F portfolio and 13F.est files.  Going forward, the process will still require that new securities and relevant asset classes be classified specifically for the 13F report, but future report runs should be simpler.

For more info on 13F reporting, refer to the SEC’s document detailing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.

iStock_000011255731XSmallWhen Advent first introduced The Professional Portfolio (aka Proport) 25 years ago, one feature that contributed  largely to its long-term success was the ability to get data in and out of the program easily.  Advent software has continued to make this feature a priority throughout every iteration of their original portfolio management product line.

In contrast competing products like Centerpiece, which would eventually be purchased by Schwab and rebranded Portfolio Center, appeared to be a black box.  You could see what was being calculated, but could not see the components of the calculation.

Proport files were stored in an open text format and could be easily read and written as necessary.  Axys v1.x, Advent’s premier Windows product at the time, maintained a similar open file structure.  Axys v2.x was the first version to implement a binary file format.  At the time, some users were concerned that the format change would complicate maintenance of existing customized solutions and inhibit their ability to continue to create solutions that exchanged data with Advent’s portfolio management system.

Firms were slow to embrace Axys v2.x and some never upgraded to it.  Perhaps it was concern over the new file formats.  Instead, most firms eventually upgraded to Axys v3.x. Concerns about the format change were moot since Advent also introduced IMEX, which allowed users to import and export files in CSV, tab, and fixed formats.

Exceptions apply, but the IMEX tool facilitates the ability to move data in and out of Axys with relative ease.  The features of IMEX combined with the ability to import transaction and label data through the trade blotter provide a comprehensive means to get fundemental data in and out of Advent Axys and APX.  Additional methods of importing and exporting data follow:

Axys users may write or read data directly to data files if they have knowledge of the underlying data format.  However, this is not a best practice due to changing file formats between versions.  For example, upgrading from Axys v3.7 to v3.8 requires a file conversion process.  Some of the resulting Axys v3.8 files have a different file format, so any process directly writing or reading these files would need to be updated to take the new file formats into account.

APX users may

  1. query the APX database via Excel (and other software programs).
  2. write SSRS or Crystal reports to extract data.
  3. use many other SQL based tools to export and import selected data.

Axys and APX users can

  1. export reports directly to Excel with the push of a button or create a macro that stores report output in XLS and other file formats.
  2. create custom reports via Report Writer Pro, which can easily be changed to CSV format.
  3. modify existing replang reports to build CSV, other text formats, and various Advent file formats.
  4. use third-party Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) products like xPort.

APX (v1.x to v4.x) maintains the functionality of IMEX, but the ability to generate files in a fixed format has been eliminated.  In addition, you can export data to an Axys v3 format.

Due to these capabilities and a host of other Advent features that facilitate automation and integration, Axys and APX users as well as third-party vendors like ISITC.com have developed many custom solutions utilizing Advent Software’s infrastructure to address day-to-day investment operations workflow and reporting requirements.  The building blocks of these solutions faciliate subsequent projects and allow investment firms to further enhance Advent’s portfolio management systems to meet their evolving needs with less effort and cost.

Here is a sample of some VB code we use to integrate and automate data handling of exported Axys and APX data.  The code can be used in Excel with VBA and User-Defined Functions (UDFs) to pull data from Axys and APX like Bloomberg BLP functions are used in Excel. This function is just one of the routines in our library of code that enable us to seemlessly integrate our solutions with Advent’s infrastructure.  I wrote the original source code for this routine twenty years ago and have updated it as necessary to support later releases of Axys and APX.

Using similar resources, integrators can move quickly from prototype to production when developing solutions for Advent users.  In fact, Advent’s most recent annual report continues to cite customers building their own solutions as one of their largest sources of competition.  For instance, a number of firms have created their own Order Management Systems – not that I’d recommend it.

Advisors abhor inefficiency and are typically willing to make a reasonable investment to reduce it.  Automation not only increases efficiency, but lowers risk by eliminating manual processes that may rely on individuals and their exclusive knowledge of manual or semi-automatic procedures.  Some financial services firms have customized their systems to a degree that makes staying on the Advent platform for twenty plus years possible and the thought of switching to another platform regrettable.

Thanks to the way Advent handles getting data in and out of their systems, users can continue using Axys to meet their ever-changing system requirements and leverage most solutions created for Axys on the APX platform.   Similar and potentially better tech options may exist on other competing platforms, but most of those systems lack the maturity, depth of resources, third-party relationships, and corresponding reliability of Advent’s platform choices.  Knowledge and acceptance of these competing products among advisors, employees, and third-party solution providers won’t match Advent for a long time.

As a result, even though technologically superior portfolio management platforms may emerge, many firms will continue using Advent’s best known portfolio management systems for the foreseeable future.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.

iStock_000011903357XSmallAs quarter end approaches once more, investment advisors gather their resolve and strive to implement new system enhancements to client statements before Q2 arrives. We all wish it could be different, but it is simply the nature of the business. Even firms with good-looking statements may rush to enhance them by incorporating new features such as blended indexes or minor report edits prior to quarter end.

Most of the systems implemented at investment advisories are run on a daily basis, but client statements are typically generated on a quarterly basis. Some investment managers produce monthly statements, but they are in the minority. In the near future, these types of periodic statements will become less relevant than an investor’s ability to generate meaningful client statements on demand.

Amending the quarterly reporting process and report packages requires a disciplined process of setting manageable goals, gaining approval, implementing changes, testing systems and resolving potential problems. Those responsible for creating the reports require approval from management, and until they get that final approval, the time necessary to comfortably implement the changes continues to slip away.

“THE ONLY CONSTANT IS CHANGE” -Heraclitus

As quarter end gets closer, it is not unusual for those involved in the project to get mixed messages about what needs to be done for this quarter. Operations staff juggle various responsibilities. Ad hoc requests, changing priorities and management decision delays inevitably create the need to do last-minute work or postpone the project until the next month, quarter, or even year. With these types of delays, it is a wonder that any progress towards creating better client statements is ever made.

At most larger firms, management is comprised of a number of voices that have a say in whether a firm adapts new systems and reports. The decision to change quarterly reports isn’t made in a vacuum. It is a decision that may depend on a firm’s dedication to their current portfolio management system or a need to allocate limited budget resources to other high-priority issues. Good quarterly reports also underscore a firm’s philosophy, so deep thought and considerable discourse can play a part in determining the content and appearance of client statements.

SOME AXYS USERS DO NOTHING WHILE OTHERS THINK ABOUT MAKING A DECISION.

Before you summarily dismiss all Axys users as being hopelessly outdated and technically inept because they haven’t upgraded to APX or moved to another more recently released Portfolio Management System (PMS), you should understand that there are many decent-sized firms out there that are still using Axys to manage hundreds of millions or billions in assets.  Though a small group of firms really do fit the preceding description, most firms do not. The majority are firms that understand the current shortcomings of Axys and the potential benefits of APX, but also value the simplicity, efficiency, and reliability of Axys.  These firms may have considered Advent’s other offerings: Black Diamond and Geneva, but haven’t managed to find a solution that works for their firm.

As a growing number of these Axys users may be questioning their commitment to Advent, it is only natural that they vacillate to some degree between putting more money into their existing platform or changing the platform altogether. I suspect that many of Advent’s Axys clients now fit into two categories: those who are indifferent and those facing decision paralysis.

Those who are indifferent use Axys like a calculator and will continue to do so until it becomes apparent that they cannot use it any more. Those facing decision paralysis will also continue to use Axys – albeit with some reservations – until another vendor steals them away or Advent makes a bold announcement to continue to support these lost souls with renewed vigor.

In the end, a firm’s need to keep pace with client expectations and technology by providing innovative reporting should win out whether that is achieved by spending money on their existing platform or embracing another. For now, like many in the industry, I continue to hurry up and wait for investment advisors and Advent Software to do something.

About the Author: Kevin Shea is President of InfoSystems Integrated, Inc. (ISI); ISI provides a wide variety of outsourced IT solutions to investment advisors nationwide.

For details, please visit isitc.com, contact Kevin Shea via phone at 617-720-3400 x202 or e-mail at kshea@isitc.com.